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Ginger Baker Trio

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Ron Miles (trumpet) * Fred Hess (tenor saxophone) * Eric Gunnison (piano) * Artie Moore (bass) * Ginger Baker (drums) * plus Shamie Royston (organ) * Todd Ayers (guitar) * Glenn Taylor (pedal steel guitar) & special guest James Carter (bass clarinet & baritone saxophone)

After two critically-hailed Atlantic trio albums with Charlie Haden and Bill Frisell, the legendary Ginger Baker returns with COWARD OF THE COUNTY, the recorded debut from his Denver Jazz Quintet-To-Octet. As the name indicates, the group is a shifting unit of accomplished jazz players whose core includes bassist Artie Moore, saxophonist Fred Hess, pianist Eric Gunnison, and trumpeter/composer Ron Miles well known for his work with Bill Frisell.

At the center of COWARD OF THE COUNTY is the fast-developing creative partnership between Baker and Miles, also an accomplished solo artist with four albums to his credit. Soon to be heard on the instrumental jazz companion to 1998s much-touted PAINTED FROM MEMORY by Elvis Costello and Burt Bacharach, Miles composed six of the albums eight tracks. Rons a genius and we just work well together, says Baker. We think very much alike. In fact, I think Ron knows my playing better than I do.

Produced by Baker and Miles and recorded direct-to-stereo by Danny Kopelson, COWARD OF THE COUNTY represents a remarkable new chapter in the musical life of the man who injected rock n roll with some of its most electrifying and expressive drumming. Ever dedicated to the power of the moment, the album was recorded wholly live, with most tracks being cut on initial takes.

Theres so many people, especially in the pop world, who take anything from a year to two years to make records, spending fortunes, says Baker, who celebrates his 60th birthday on August 19th. Its good for the studios, no doubt. Today, because of the technology of recording, they can redo a part over and over do it a bar or even a beat at a time. What comes out in the end is completely false, because they cant do it live. Ive never taken more than two weeks to make a record in my life.

Gathered for two days of exciting sessions last September at Denvers Colorado Sound Recording Studios, the master percussionist and crew laid down such striking and original tracks as the lively Baker-penned Dangle The Carrot, the dramatically shifting Jesus Loves Me, and the plaintive Megan Showers.

Celebrated Atlantic reed phenom James Carter joins the DJQ2O on four tracks, adding yet another level of extraordinary musicianship to the already stellar lineup. What struck me is what a good ensemble player he is, says Miles of Carter. I mean, he was always there with the most subtle stuff, very mature music. I was just amazed at what a free player he is, too. His enthusiasm for the date was also nice when he wasnt playing, hed be there with his cans on just listening to the music.

Carter is heard with bari sax on both the slow-grooving Cyril Davies and cool-popping Ginger Spice, while taking up the bass clarinet on the intricate Jesus Loves Me and Jesus, I Just Want To Go To Sleep. The latter, previously recorded for Miless 1997 WOMANS DAY album, also shines as Carters showcase piece with Artie Moore.

Bass clarinet just has a certain voice it sounds like a very wise instrument, says Carter. It has a certain sage to it. Its like sitting under a tree with an individual that has a story to tell. I was so impressed with James, especially on Jesus Loves Me, because he didnt have all the rehearsal time we did, says Baker. He did just the one rehearsal, came into the studio, and he got it. Everything was done on take one or take two.

You had to get a certain type of buoyancy that made you valid on every bar, says Carter, commenting on the challenge of the track. You had to make a musical statement that was away from the conventional norm. It was cool to have that demand to meet where you werent always sure-footed. It was the art-of-the-moment.

The character of the recordings take on varying inflections with the keyboard contributions of Shamie Royston and Eric Gunnison whose individual styles Miles took to heart in his writing. The studio cast also included guitarist Todd Ayers, a veteran of Miless WOMANS DAY album, and pedal steel player Glenn Taylor, with whom Miles had played for years in the Fred Hess-led Boulder Creative Music Ensemble. It is through the performances of these unique players, on such tracks as the amusingly titled Ginger Spice and the albums title track, that the fully staffed Quintet takes flight.

I wanted us to have a sense of variety on the record, says Miles, who teaches trumpet and jazz history at Metropolitan State College in Denver. My model for that is always Jelly Roll Morton. When I write, I try envision a big Jelly Roll Morton composition and get as many instrumental colors together as I can. The original plan was for the group to record COWARD OF THE COUNTY in March, 1998. However, the sessions were canceled when Baker entered the hospital to undergo major shoulder surgery as the result of an old but persistently troublesome polo injury. I only had about 75 per cent use of my right arm, says Baker. I played with my injuries for several years, until it got so painful that I had to get something done about it.

Recording plans were again delayed by a freak stable accident that summer, resulting in Bakers suffering three broken ribs. The injury was the unintentional handiwork of a young chestnut thoroughbred gelding named Clyde. I still only had one arm working after the surgery, explains Baker. I was leading two horses out of the barn and they got their heads down, because there was a bit of hay on the floor. They got tangled up so I had to pass the rope over one horse to get them untangled. Not having my other arm, I had to lean right over the horse. Suddenly he threw his head up and I went flying. You dont quite realize how powerful horses are til something like that happens.

During the groups subsequent downtime, Miles continued to write new material for the album. In fact, the majority of tracks found on the album were composed in the months following Bakers encounter with Clyde. By September, Baker had healed enough that the band was able to get together for rehearsals at Miless house. Before the recording sessions finally went off, I was praying that Ginger wasnt going to try to fix anything around his house I could just imagine him falling off his roof again, says Miles with a laugh. But yeah, hes a tough, tough guy. Its inspiring the way he works through anything that gets in his way. Hes a total professional.

Bakers class and life-long reverence for great players is readily evident within his self-composed album-opener, Cyril Davies. Davies, a harmonica player and vocalist who died in his early 30s, left an indelible mark on the history of British blues as a member of The Alexis Korner Blues Incorporated. The group, founded with the famed Korner, also featured an up-and-coming Ginger Baker. Davies also won renown with his own Cyril Davies R&B All-Stars, which he led until his untimely death in the early 60s.

The Alexis Korner Blues Incorporated was the first band, as far as I know, to incorporate jazz musicians and blues musicians, says Baker. Everywhere we played in London was packed, packed solid. It was a whole new event musically and Cyril was a major part of it. He was totally against me joining the band at first. But at the first rehearsal we played a number, just off the cuff, and afterward he came up to me and said, Fucking hell, man... welcome. Tribute of another kind comes with Bakers liner note thanks to his four drum heroes: Max Roach; Elvin Jones; and the late Phil Seamen and Art Blakey each of whom he became close friends with at one time or other.

Thats worth more to me than anything else in this world, says Baker of the relationships with his fellow drummers. Ive played with them all and they gave me a lot of encouragement. I was very lucky like that with my musical career all the way through. I never paid for a lesson in my life.

Im very shy, he continues. Thats why when people come up and say, Im a drummer, man have you got any tips, my usual response is, Yeah, fuck off. Before I met him, I actually sat next to Phil Seamen in the Downbeat Club one night and I didnt dare speak to him, yknow. But if I hear a young drummer and like what theyre playing, then I feel duty-bound to go up and tell them so. Its what happened to me and Ill never forget that.

From Trio to Quintet-to-Octet

Originally prompted by the prescient reveries of respected music journalist Chip Stern, the Ginger Baker Trio first gathered in March, 1994, to flight test the idea through a four-day stretch of unrehearsed live recording. The notion was to join the esteemed drummer with Charlie Haden and Bill Frisell highly regarded improvisers, fully able to challenge, move, and inspire Baker.

The resulting GOING BACK HOME album received widespread critical acclaim and rave reviews in such publications as Musician, Rolling Stone (four stars), Downbeat (five stars), and CD Review, who named it jazz CD of the year; the album also ranked in the top 5 of the Billboard jazz chart and was a #1 college radio hit for eight consecutive weeks.

The release of the Ginger Baker Trios GOING BACK HOME coincided with BBMs AROUND THE NEXT DREAM Bakers 1994 recorded reunion with Jack Bruce, in a trio that included Gary Moore (Thin Lizzy, Colosseum, solo). The album was followed by a subsequent BBM tour, once described by Baker as a pretty horrendous experience.

1995 would be a busy and adventurous year, a time during which he would meet Miles and Artie Moore, launch the Denver Jazz Quintet, and record his second Ginger Baker Trio album with Haden and Frisell. In fact, Frisell was the catalyst for the formation of the DJQ. In the spring of 1995, a specially assembled Frisell quartet featuring Ron and Artie was playing a gig in Denver. Naturally, Baker was on hand to see what his Trio partner was up. Backstage after the set, Baker was introduced to Ron and Artie and soon suggested they all get together to play.

I was totally blown away by the two of them, recalls Baker. The Denver concert also led to Frisells QUARTET album recorded with a cast made up of Miles, Eyvind Kang (violin, tuba), and Curtis Fowlkes (trombone). Within the space of a year, the outfit completed two celebrated European tours and numerous U.S. dates. But before all that would happen, the newly conceived DJQ, rounded out by saxophonist Fred Hess and noted guitarist Jerry Hahn, would become the highlight of the summer at Bakers beloved Mile High Polo Club in Parker. The groups live debut came after one of Bakers matches.

This was the perfect opportunity to combine the two great loves of my life, jazz and polo, says Baker, who began his love affair with the sport on the polo grounds of Nigeria in 1974. It was just a big jam session, says Miles of that first gig. It was really fun and real loose. Hunter S. Thompson was there. I remember, because he talked to me and I had no idea what he was saying.

With each member being subject to regular scheduling conflicts, the line-up varied from week to week, with Miless MSC music students occasionally stepping up. Likewise, as Hahn prepared to move to Oregon, pianist Eric Gunnison signed on. In addition to the Mile High sets, the DJQ performed locally at the Parker Music Festival and at Vails Gerald Ford Amphitheatre. Still, the focus was on the marriage of polo and jazz. Of course, there were days when Gingers match play would threaten to scrub the post-game gig.

Hed take some serious tumbles, says Miles with a laugh. Once, Fred said he thought Ginger had actually died during a match. He was motionless on the ground after falling from his horse. But after a few minutes he got up and went back to it. Sometimes hed come over to sit at the drums and hed be all nicked up. He is indestructible.

Its just something I found I could do, says Baker of his polo habit. Its like the first time I played the drums Oh, shit. I can do this . In late 1995, with the DJQ steaming ahead and recording sessions for the second Ginger Baker Trio album just a week away, Baker was injured in a fall from the roof of his Front Range home. Determined to go on, work commenced on the album with a bruised and somewhat cracked Ginger recovering from what he jokingly referred to as his publicity stunt.

The resulting second Atlantic set, released in 1996 and appropriately dubbed FALLING OFF THE ROOF, again earned the Baker/Frisell/Haden trio extensive critical acclaim. The recordings took on a new dimension through the contributions of Bela Fleck on banjo and Jerry Hahn.

Just as their debut outing was extraordinary because the ensemble interplay was inspired and egoless, their sophomore collection radiates with simpatico collaborations, said Sterophile of the album. This second album is even better, cheered Jazziz, while noting Bakers restraint, sensitivity, and musicality. Jazz Times called FALLING OFF THE ROOF another vivid chapter in (Bakers) ongoing self-reinvention.

However, by the time the album was drawing such raves, the Trio had long since headed in three separate directions, as individual schedules and commitments demanded. For his part, Baker returned to his beloved DJQ. Following a widely hailed week-long engagement at New York Citys Iridium in March of 1997, plans were made to capture the groups energy and artistry on tape. That was the chance to work up some new material, says Miles of the Iridium stand. Instead of doing standards, we started to do more obscure things, like Moon Rays by Horace Silver, Mademoiselle Mabry by Miles Davis, and then Jerry Hahns The Method. We also did some of my music, too mostly things from my WOMANS DAY album.

The New York Times writer on hand for one Iridium set was also taken with Baker and the diversity of sounds and styles the DJQ employed. Mr. Baker... implies a lot with a little, and often conversely a delicate idea with a heavy technique, said Ben Ratliff, comparing his drumming to that of a 1930s show band or of Ornette Colemans 60s-era drummer, Edward Blackwell.

On March 29th, 1999 barely more than a week prior to the release of COWARD OF THE COUNTY the DJQ2O played what may have been their farewell American performance. On stage at the venerable Hermans Highway in Denver, the group played the complete album notably, for the first time since it was recorded before a packed house of jazz heads, rockers, and regulars. On April 6th as the album arrived in stores Baker was leaving his cherished Colorado, after more than five years, to take up residence in South Africa. However, as is always true with Ginger, the unpredictable can surely be predicted.

Ron Miles (trumpet) * Fred Hess (tenor saxophone) * Eric Gunnison (piano) * Artie Moore (bass) * Ginger Baker (drums) * plus Shamie Royston (organ) * Todd Ayers (guitar) * Glenn Taylor (pedal steel guitar) & special guest James Carter (bass clarinet & baritone saxophone)

After two critically-hailed Atlantic trio albums with Charlie Haden and Bill Frisell, the legendary Ginger Baker returns with COWARD OF THE COUNTY, the recorded debut from his Denver Jazz Quintet-To-Octet. As the name indicates, the group is a shifting unit of accomplished jazz players whose core includes bassist Artie Moore, saxophonist Fred Hess, pianist Eric Gunnison, and trumpeter/composer Ron Miles well known for his work with Bill Frisell.

At the center of COWARD OF THE COUNTY is the fast-developing creative partnership between Baker and Miles, also an accomplished solo artist with four albums to his credit. Soon to be heard on the instrumental jazz companion to 1998s much-touted PAINTED FROM MEMORY by Elvis Costello and Burt Bacharach, Miles composed six of the albums eight tracks. Rons a genius and we just work well together, says Baker. We think very much alike. In fact, I think Ron knows my playing better than I do.

Produced by Baker and Miles and recorded direct-to-stereo by Danny Kopelson, COWARD OF THE COUNTY represents a remarkable new chapter in the musical life of the man who injected rock n roll with some of its most electrifying and expressive drumming. Ever dedicated to the power of the moment, the album was recorded wholly live, with most tracks being cut on initial takes.

Theres so many people, especially in the pop world, who take anything from a year to two years to make records, spending fortunes, says Baker, who celebrates his 60th birthday on August 19th. Its good for the studios, no doubt. Today, because of the technology of recording, they can redo a part over and over do it a bar or even a beat at a time. What comes out in the end is completely false, because they cant do it live. Ive never taken more than two weeks to make a record in my life.

Gathered for two days of exciting sessions last September at Denvers Colorado Sound Recording Studios, the master percussionist and crew laid down such striking and original tracks as the lively Baker-penned Dangle The Carrot, the dramatically shifting Jesus Loves Me, and the plaintive Megan Showers.

Celebrated Atlantic reed phenom James Carter joins the DJQ2O on four tracks, adding yet another level of extraordinary musicianship to the already stellar lineup. What struck me is what a good ensemble player he is, says Miles of Carter. I mean, he was always there with the most subtle stuff, very mature music. I was just amazed at what a free player he is, too. His enthusiasm for the date was also nice when he wasnt playing, hed be there with his cans on just listening to the music.

Carter is heard with bari sax on both the slow-grooving Cyril Davies and cool-popping Ginger Spice, while taking up the bass clarinet on the intricate Jesus Loves Me and Jesus, I Just Want To Go To Sleep. The latter, previously recorded for Miless 1997 WOMANS DAY album, also shines as Carters showcase piece with Artie Moore.

Bass clarinet just has a certain voice it sounds like a very wise instrument, says Carter. It has a certain sage to it. Its like sitting under a tree with an individual that has a story to tell. I was so impressed with James, especially on Jesus Loves Me, because he didnt have all the rehearsal time we did, says Baker. He did just the one rehearsal, came into the studio, and he got it. Everything was done on take one or take two.

You had to get a certain type of buoyancy that made you valid on every bar, says Carter, commenting on the challenge of the track. You had to make a musical statement that was away from the conventional norm. It was cool to have that demand to meet where you werent always sure-footed. It was the art-of-the-moment.

The character of the recordings take on varying inflections with the keyboard contributions of Shamie Royston and Eric Gunnison whose individual styles Miles took to heart in his writing. The studio cast also included guitarist Todd Ayers, a veteran of Miless WOMANS DAY album, and pedal steel player Glenn Taylor, with whom Miles had played for years in the Fred Hess-led Boulder Creative Music Ensemble. It is through the performances of these unique players, on such tracks as the amusingly titled Ginger Spice and the albums title track, that the fully staffed Quintet takes flight.

I wanted us to have a sense of variety on the record, says Miles, who teaches trumpet and jazz history at Metropolitan State College in Denver. My model for that is always Jelly Roll Morton. When I write, I try envision a big Jelly Roll Morton composition and get as many instrumental colors together as I can. The original plan was for the group to record COWARD OF THE COUNTY in March, 1998. However, the sessions were canceled when Baker entered the hospital to undergo major shoulder surgery as the result of an old but persistently troublesome polo injury. I only had about 75 per cent use of my right arm, says Baker. I played with my injuries for several years, until it got so painful that I had to get something done about it.

Recording plans were again delayed by a freak stable accident that summer, resulting in Bakers suffering three broken ribs. The injury was the unintentional handiwork of a young chestnut thoroughbred gelding named Clyde. I still only had one arm working after the surgery, explains Baker. I was leading two horses out of the barn and they got their heads down, because there was a bit of hay on the floor. They got tangled up so I had to pass the rope over one horse to get them untangled. Not having my other arm, I had to lean right over the horse. Suddenly he threw his head up and I went flying. You dont quite realize how powerful horses are til something like that happens.

During the groups subsequent downtime, Miles continued to write new material for the album. In fact, the majority of tracks found on the album were composed in the months following Bakers encounter with Clyde. By September, Baker had healed enough that the band was able to get together for rehearsals at Miless house. Before the recording sessions finally went off, I was praying that Ginger wasnt going to try to fix anything around his house I could just imagine him falling off his roof again, says Miles with a laugh. But yeah, hes a tough, tough guy. Its inspiring the way he works through anything that gets in his way. Hes a total professional.

Bakers class and life-long reverence for great players is readily evident within his self-composed album-opener, Cyril Davies. Davies, a harmonica player and vocalist who died in his early 30s, left an indelible mark on the history of British blues as a member of The Alexis Korner Blues Incorporated. The group, founded with the famed Korner, also featured an up-and-coming Ginger Baker. Davies also won renown with his own Cyril Davies R&B All-Stars, which he led until his untimely death in the early 60s.

The Alexis Korner Blues Incorporated was the first band, as far as I know, to incorporate jazz musicians and blues musicians, says Baker. Everywhere we played in London was packed, packed solid. It was a whole new event musically and Cyril was a major part of it. He was totally against me joining the band at first. But at the first rehearsal we played a number, just off the cuff, and afterward he came up to me and said, Fucking hell, man... welcome. Tribute of another kind comes with Bakers liner note thanks to his four drum heroes: Max Roach; Elvin Jones; and the late Phil Seamen and Art Blakey each of whom he became close friends with at one time or other.

Thats worth more to me than anything else in this world, says Baker of the relationships with his fellow drummers. Ive played with them all and they gave me a lot of encouragement. I was very lucky like that with my musical career all the way through. I never paid for a lesson in my life.

I'm very shy, he continues. Thats why when people come up and say, Im a drummer, man have you got any tips, my usual response is, Yeah, fuck off. Before I met him, I actually sat next to Phil Seamen in the Downbeat Club one night and I didnt dare speak to him, yknow. But if I hear a young drummer and like what theyre playing, then I feel duty-bound to go up and tell them so. Its what happened to me and Ill never forget that.

From Trio to Quintet-to-Octet

Originally prompted by the prescient reveries of respected music journalist Chip Stern, the Ginger Baker Trio first gathered in March, 1994, to flight test the idea through a four-day stretch of unrehearsed live recording. The notion was to join the esteemed drummer with Charlie Haden and Bill Frisell highly regarded improvisers, fully able to challenge, move, and inspire Baker.

The resulting GOING BACK HOME album received widespread critical acclaim and rave reviews in such publications as Musician, Rolling Stone (four stars), Downbeat (five stars), and CD Review, who named it jazz CD of the year; the album also ranked in the top 5 of the Billboard jazz chart and was a #1 college radio hit for eight consecutive weeks.

The release of the Ginger Baker Trios GOING BACK HOME coincided with BBMs AROUND THE NEXT DREAM Bakers 1994 recorded reunion with Jack Bruce, in a trio that included Gary Moore (Thin Lizzy, Colosseum, solo). The album was followed by a subsequent BBM tour, once described by Baker as a pretty horrendous experience.

1995 would be a busy and adventurous year, a time during which he would meet Miles and Artie Moore, launch the Denver Jazz Quintet, and record his second Ginger Baker Trio album with Haden and Frisell. In fact, Frisell was the catalyst for the formation of the DJQ. In the spring of 1995, a specially assembled Frisell quartet featuring Ron and Artie was playing a gig in Denver. Naturally, Baker was on hand to see what his Trio partner was up. Backstage after the set, Baker was introduced to Ron and Artie and soon suggested they all get together to play.

I was totally blown away by the two of them, recalls Baker. The Denver concert also led to Frisells QUARTET album recorded with a cast made up of Miles, Eyvind Kang (violin, tuba), and Curtis Fowlkes (trombone). Within the space of a year, the outfit completed two celebrated European tours and numerous U.S. dates. But before all that would happen, the newly conceived DJQ, rounded out by saxophonist Fred Hess and noted guitarist Jerry Hahn, would become the highlight of the summer at Bakers beloved Mile High Polo Club in Parker. The groups live debut came after one of Bakers matches.

This was the perfect opportunity to combine the two great loves of my life, jazz and polo, says Baker, who began his love affair with the sport on the polo grounds of Nigeria in 1974. It was just a big jam session, says Miles of that first gig. It was really fun and real loose. Hunter S. Thompson was there. I remember, because he talked to me and I had no idea what he was saying.

With each member being subject to regular scheduling conflicts, the line-up varied from week to week, with Miless MSC music students occasionally stepping up. Likewise, as Hahn prepared to move to Oregon, pianist Eric Gunnison signed on. In addition to the Mile High sets, the DJQ performed locally at the Parker Music Festival and at Vails Gerald Ford Amphitheatre. Still, the focus was on the marriage of polo and jazz. Of course, there were days when Gingers match play would threaten to scrub the post-game gig.

Hed take some serious tumbles, says Miles with a laugh. Once, Fred said he thought Ginger had actually died during a match. He was motionless on the ground after falling from his horse. But after a few minutes he got up and went back to it. Sometimes hed come over to sit at the drums and hed be all nicked up. He is indestructible.

Its just something I found I could do, says Baker of his polo habit. Its like the first time I played the drums Oh, shit. I can do this . In late 1995, with the DJQ steaming ahead and recording sessions for the second Ginger Baker Trio album just a week away, Baker was injured in a fall from the roof of his Front Range home. Determined to go on, work commenced on the album with a bruised and somewhat cracked Ginger recovering from what he jokingly referred to as his publicity stunt.

The resulting second Atlantic set, released in 1996 and appropriately dubbed FALLING OFF THE ROOF, again earned the Baker/Frisell/Haden trio extensive critical acclaim. The recordings took on a new dimension through the contributions of Bela Fleck on banjo and Jerry Hahn.

Just as their debut outing was extraordinary because the ensemble interplay was inspired and egoless, their sophomore collection radiates with simpatico collaborations, said Sterophile of the album. This second album is even better, cheered Jazziz, while noting Bakers restraint, sensitivity, and musicality. Jazz Times called FALLING OFF THE ROOF another vivid chapter in (Bakers) ongoing self-reinvention.

However, by the time the album was drawing such raves, the Trio had long since headed in three separate directions, as individual schedules and commitments demanded. For his part, Baker returned to his beloved DJQ. Following a widely hailed week-long engagement at New York Citys Iridium in March of 1997, plans were made to capture the groups energy and artistry on tape. That was the chance to work up some new material, says Miles of the Iridium stand. Instead of doing standards, we started to do more obscure things, like Moon Rays by Horace Silver, Mademoiselle Mabry by Miles Davis, and then Jerry Hahns The Method. We also did some of my music, too mostly things from my WOMANS DAY album.

The New York Times writer on hand for one Iridium set was also taken with Baker and the diversity of sounds and styles the DJQ employed. Mr. Baker... implies a lot with a little, and often conversely a delicate idea with a heavy technique, said Ben Ratliff, comparing his drumming to that of a 1930s show band or of Ornette Colemans 60s-era drummer, Edward Blackwell.

On March 29th, 1999 barely more than a week prior to the release of COWARD OF THE COUNTY the DJQ2O played what may have been their farewell American performance. On stage at the venerable Hermans Highway in Denver, the group played the complete album notably, for the first time since it was recorded before a packed house of jazz heads, rockers, and regulars. On April 6th as the album arrived in stores Baker was leaving his cherished Colorado, after more than five years, to take up residence in South Africa. However, as is always true with Ginger, the unpredictable can surely be predicted.

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